Dermatology 2013

Alternate Journal: JAMA dermatology

ISSN: 2168-6084 (Electronic)

DOI: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.2424

Accession Number: 23325388

Keywords: Adolescent

Adult

Ambulatory Care Facilities/*trends

Child

Colony Count, Microbial

*Dermatology

Disease Susceptibility/*epidemiology

Florida/epidemiology

Follow-Up Studies

Humans

Incidence

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*isolation & purification

Microbial Sensitivity Tests

Outpatients/*statistics & numerical data

Prevalence

Retrospective Studies

Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/*epidemiology/microbiology

Young Adult

Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the relative proportions of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) were changing or stable in an outpatient dermatology clinic and to examine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of S aureus isolates. DESIGN: Retrospective observational data were collected from skin culture isolates annually between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2010, and monthly during the 6-month period of January 1, 2011, to June 30, 2011. SETTING: The University of Miami Hospital outpatient dermatology clinic. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 387 S aureus isolates were analyzed between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2011, from adult and pediatric patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The relative proportions of MRSA and MSSA skin culture isolates were measured, along with antibiotic sensitivity profiles. RESULTS: The overall relative proportion of MRSA was 35.7%. The overall relative proportion of MSSA was 64.3%. During the last 6 months of the study, the relative proportion of MRSA was 33.3%, while the relative proportion of MSSA was 66.7%. The relative proportion of MRSA from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2010, was significantly higher than the relative proportion from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2007 (45.3% vs 28.3%, P = .001). MRSA became more sensitive to ciprofloxacin, while MSSA became more resistant to ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin sulfate, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. CONCLUSIONS: The relative proportion of MRSA in the S aureus isolates increased by 17.0% during the last 3 years of our study. Despite this increase, MRSA became more sensitive to ciprofloxacin, while MSSA demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance to ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295