Dermatology 2013

Notes: Watson, Alice J

Redbord, Kelley

Taylor, James S

Shippy, Alison

Kostecki, James

Swerlick, Robert

eng

2013/01/31 06:00

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 May;68(5):729-37. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2012.10.058. Epub 2013 Jan 27.

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23360864

Author Address: Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. AJWatson@partners.org

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 4294Author: Weingast, J., Scheibbock, C., Wurm, E. M., Ranharter, E., Porkert, S., Dreiseitl, S., Posch, C. and Binder, M.

Year: 2013

Title: A prospective study of mobile phones for dermatology in a clinical setting

Journal: J Telemed Telecare

Volume: 19

Issue: 4

Pages: 213-8

Date: Jun

Short Title: A prospective study of mobile phones for dermatology in a clinical setting

Alternate Journal: Journal of telemedicine and telecare

ISSN: 1758-1109 (Electronic)

1357-633X (Linking)

DOI: 10.1177/1357633X13490890

Accession Number: 24163062

Keywords: Adult

Ambulatory Care Facilities

Austria/epidemiology

Cellular Phone/*utilization

Dermatology/*methods

Diagnosis, Differential

Female

Humans

Male

Middle Aged

Outpatients

Photography

Prospective Studies

Questionnaires

Telemedicine/instrumentation/*methods

Abstract: We evaluated the accuracy of diagnoses made from pictures taken with the built-in cameras of mobile phones in a ‘real-life’ clinical setting. A total of 263 patients took part, who photographed their own lesions where possible, and provided clinical information via a questionnaire. After the teledermatology procedure, each patient was examined face-to-face and a gold standard diagnosis was made. The telemedicine data and pictures were diagnosed by 15 dermatologists. The 299 cases contained 1-22 clinical images each (median 3). Nine dermatologists finished all the cases and the remaining six completed some of them, thus providing 2893 decisions. Overall, 61% of all cases were rated as possible to diagnose and of those, 80% were correct in comparison with the face-to-face diagnosis. Image quality was evaluated and the median was 5 on a 10-point scale. There was a significant correlation between the correct diagnosis and the quality of the photographs taken (P < 0.001). In nearly two-thirds of all cases, a teledermatology diagnosis was possible; however, there was insufficient information to make a telemedicine diagnosis in about one-third of the cases. If applied carefully, mobile phones could be a powerful tool for people to optimize their health care status.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295