Dermatology 2013

Notes: Hanke, C William

Moy, Ronald L

Roenigk, Randall K

Roenigk, Henry H Jr

Spencer, James M

Tierney, Emily P

Bartus, Cynthia L

Bernstein, Robert M

Brown, Marc D

Busso, Mariano

Carruthers, Alastair

Carruthers, Jean

Ibrahimi, Omar A

Kauvar, Arielle N B

Kent, Kathryn M

Krueger, Nils

Landau, Marina

Leonard, Aimee L

Mandy, Stephen H

Rohrer, Thomas E

Sadick, Neil S

Wiest, Luitgard G

eng

2013/10/09 06:00

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 Dec;69(6):972-1001. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2013.04.067. Epub 2013 Oct 5.

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24099730

Author Address: Laser and Skin Surgery Center of Indiana, Carmel, Indiana.

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 4527Author: Harman, R. J.

Year: 2013

Title: Stem cell therapy in veterinary dermatology

Journal: Vet Dermatol

Volume: 24

Issue: 1

Pages: 90-6 e23-4

Date: Feb

Short Title: Stem cell therapy in veterinary dermatology

Alternate Journal: Veterinary dermatology

ISSN: 1365-3164 (Electronic)

0959-4493 (Linking)

DOI: 10.1111/vde.12000

Accession Number: 23331685

Keywords: Animals

Dermatology/*methods/trends

Skin Diseases/therapy/*veterinary

Stem Cell Transplantation/*veterinary

Stem Cells/physiology

Veterinary Medicine/*methods

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Adult stem cells come from many sources and have the capacity to differentiate into many cell types, including those of the skin. The most commonly studied stem cells are those termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are easily isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue. Mesenchymal stem cells are known to produce a wide array of cytokines that modulate the regeneration process. The ease of collection, propagation and use of these MSCs in therapy of traumatic, ischaemic and immune-mediated skin conditions is emerging. APPROACH AND EVIDENCE: In traumatic and ischaemic skin damage, MSCs are used in tissue-engineered skin and by direct injection into damaged tissue. For immune-mediated diseases, systemic administration of stem cells can modulate the immune system. The earliest clinical work has been with autologous stem cell sources, such as adipose tissue and bone marrow. In immune-mediated diseases, the MSCs are used to downregulate production of inflammatory cytokines and to block T-cell activation. Cells are generally given intravenously. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus have been successfully treated in human clinical trials. Mesenchymal stem cells can also stimulate resident local cells, such as keratinocytes and progenitor cells, to proliferate, migrate and repair skin injury and disease. LOOKING AHEAD: The discovery of the MSC in adipose tissue has spawned a global effort to utilize these cells in therapy of a wide range of diseases of the skin. Reconstructive surgery, scar blocking and resolution and skin regeneration have all been shown to be possible in human and animal studies.

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