Dermatology 2013

Notes: Gupta, Madhulika A

Gupta, Aditya K

eng

2012/12/19 06:00

Clin Dermatol. 2013 Jan-Feb;31(1):118-26. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2011.11.016.

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23245983

Author Address: Department of Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, 585 Springbank Dr, Suite 101, London, ON, N6J 1H3, Canada. magupta@uwo.ca

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 4545Author: Gupta, M. A. and Gupta, A. K.

Year: 2013

Title: Evaluation of cutaneous body image dissatisfaction in the dermatology patient

Journal: Clin Dermatol

Volume: 31

Issue: 1

Pages: 72-9

Date: Jan-Feb

Short Title: Evaluation of cutaneous body image dissatisfaction in the dermatology patient

Alternate Journal: Clinics in dermatology

ISSN: 1879-1131 (Electronic)

0738-081X (Linking)

DOI: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2011.11.010

Accession Number: 23245977

Keywords: Adolescent

Age Factors

Body Dysmorphic Disorders/complications/*psychology

Body Image/*psychology

Cosmetic Techniques/adverse effects/*psychology

Culture

Female

Humans

Male

Psychiatric Status Rating Scales

*Self Concept

Skin Diseases/*psychology/therapy

Surgery, Plastic/adverse effects/*psychology

Abstract: Cutaneous body image (CBI), defined as the individual’s mental representation of his or her skin, hair, and nails, is an important clinical factor in dermatologic disorders and often the primary consideration in deciding whether to proceed with cosmetic procedures or institute treatment in some skin disorders such as acne. CBI is a highly subjective construct that can be significantly confounded by cultural, psychosocial, and psychiatric factors. Assessment of CBI in the dermatology patient is best accomplished using a biopsychosocial model that involves (1) evaluation of concerns about the appearance of the skin, hair, and nails, (2) assessment of comorbid body image pathologies, especially body dysmorphic disorder, and (3) assessment of other psychiatric comorbidities such as major depressive disorder that can confound the presentation of the CBI complaint. Depending on the psychiatric comobidities, an assessment of suicide risk may have to be done, and if necessary, a referral made to a mental health professional. The clinician should consider the patient’s developmental stage (eg, body image concerns are likely to be much greater in the adolescent patient independent of his or her dermatologic disorder) and sociocultural background (eg, a desire for lighter skin in some ethnic groups), factors that can also have a major effect on CBI.

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