Dermatology 2013

Notes: Ganeva, Maria

Gancheva, Tanya

Troeva, Jeni

Kiriyak, Nataliya

Hristakieva, Evgenia

eng

Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t

Poland

2013/08/30 06:00

Adv Clin Exp Med. 2013 Jul-Aug;22(4):555-63.

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23986216

Author Address: Section of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Thracian University, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria.

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 4564Author: Gee, S. N., Zakhary, L., Keuthen, N., Kroshinsky, D. and Kimball, A. B.

Year: 2013

Title: A survey assessment of the recognition and treatment of psychocutaneous disorders in the outpatient dermatology setting: how prepared are we?

Journal: J Am Acad Dermatol

Volume: 68

Issue: 1

Pages: 47-52

Date: Jan

Short Title: A survey assessment of the recognition and treatment of psychocutaneous disorders in the outpatient dermatology setting: how prepared are we?

Alternate Journal: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

ISSN: 1097-6787 (Electronic)

0190-9622 (Linking)

DOI: 10.1016/j.jaad.2012.04.007

Accession Number: 22954748

Keywords: Clinical Competence

*Dermatology/education

Female

Humans

Interdisciplinary Communication

Male

Mental Disorders/complications/diagnosis/*drug therapy

*Physician’s Practice Patterns

*Psychiatry

Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use

Skin Diseases/complications/*psychology/*therapy

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Dermatologists provide the bulk of psychocutaneous care; however, recent studies suggest that dermatologists believe they are largely underprepared to treat most psychocutaneous conditions. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify gaps in psychodermatologic knowledge among practicing dermatologists in two academic institutions. METHODS: An online survey was sent to 59 dermatologists at the Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Boston, MA) from July 2010 through October 2011. RESULTS: The response rate was 40 of 59 (68%). More than 50% of dermatologists were comfortable making diagnoses for 8 of 10 psychocutaneous disorders. In all, 57% were comfortable making a diagnosis of depression. A total of 11% were comfortable starting antidepressants; 3%, antipsychotics; and 66%, medications for neuropathic pain. In all, 72%, 68%, and 21% of dermatologists never prescribe antidepressants, antipsychotics, or medications for neuropathic pain, respectively. Only 38% believed they were successful treating compulsive skin picking; 15%, body dysmorphic disorder; 27%, delusions of parasitosis; and 24%, depression. LIMITATIONS: Limitations include small sample size, data extraction from an academic setting, self-reporting of outcome measures, and response bias. CONCLUSION: Although the majority of the physicians surveyed believed they were capable of diagnosing psychocutaneous disease, very few were comfortable starting psychotropics or thought they were successful treating such conditions.

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