Cardiology 2013 (Full reference info)

Reference Type: Journal Article
Record Number: 795Author: Fox, K. A., Simpson, I. A. and Luscher, T. F.
Year: 2013
Title: The Year in Cardiology series: the most recent advances in a nutshell for the readers of the European Heart Journal
Journal: Eur Heart J
Volume: 34
Issue: 4
Pages: 307
Date: Jan
Short Title: The Year in Cardiology series: the most recent advances in a nutshell for the readers of the European Heart Journal
Alternate Journal: European heart journal
ISSN: 1522-9645 (Electronic)
0195-668X (Linking)
DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehs404
Accession Number: 23284093
Keywords: Cardiology/*trends
Europe
Humans
Periodicals as Topic
Notes: Fox, Keith A A
Simpson, Iain A
Luscher, Thomas F
eng
England
2013/01/04 06:00
Eur Heart J. 2013 Jan;34(4):307. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehs404. Epub 2013 Jan 2.
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23284093
Author Address: Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, UK.

Reference Type: Journal Article
Record Number: 851Author: Francis, D. P.
Year: 2013
Title: How easily can omission of patients, or selection amongst poorly-reproducible measurements, create artificial correlations? Methods for detection and implications for observational research design in cardiology
Journal: Int J Cardiol
Volume: 167
Issue: 1
Pages: 102-13
Date: Jul 15
Short Title: How easily can omission of patients, or selection amongst poorly-reproducible measurements, create artificial correlations? Methods for detection and implications for observational research design in cardiology
Alternate Journal: International journal of cardiology
ISSN: 1874-1754 (Electronic)
0167-5273 (Linking)
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2011.12.018
Accession Number: 22285446
Keywords: Cardiology/*methods/*standards
Humans
*Patient Selection
*Reproducibility of Results
Research Design/*standards
Abstract: BACKGROUND: When reported correlation coefficients seem too high to be true, does investigative verification of source data provide suitable reassurance? This study tests how easily omission of patients or selection amongst irreproducible measurements generate fictitious strong correlations, without data fabrication. METHOD AND RESULTS: Two forms of manipulation are applied to a pair of normally-distributed, uncorrelated variables: first, exclusion of patients least favourable to a hypothesised association and, second, making multiple poorly-reproducible measurements per patient and choosing the most supportive. Excluding patients raises correlations powerfully, from 0.0 +/- 0.11 (no patients omitted) to 0.40 +/- 0.11 (one-fifth omitted), 0.59 +/- 0.08 (one-third omitted) and 0.78 +/- 0.05 (half omitted). Study size offers no protection: omitting just one-fifth of 75 patients (i.e. publishing 60) makes 92% of correlations statistically significant. Worse, simply selecting the most favourable amongst several measurements raises correlations from 0.0 +/- 0.12 (single measurement of each variable) to 0.73 +/- 0.06 (best of 2), and 0.90 +/- 0.03 (best of 4). 100% of correlation coefficients become statistically significant. Scatterplots may reveal a telltale “shave sign” or “bite sign”. Simple statistical tests are presented for these suspicious signatures in single or multiple studies. CONCLUSION: Correlations are vulnerable to data manipulation. Cardiology is especially vulnerable to patient deletion (because cardiologists ourselves might completely control enrolment and measurement), and selection of “best” measurements (because alternative heartbeats are numerous, and some modalities poorly reproducible). Source data verification cannot detect these but tests might highlight suspicious data and–aggregating across studies–unreliable laboratories or research fields. Cardiological correlation research needs adequately-informed planning and guarantees of integrity, with teeth.
Notes: Francis, Darrel P
eng
FS/10/38/28268/British Heart Foundation/United Kingdom
Observational Study
Netherlands
2012/01/31 06:00
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Jul 15;167(1):102-13. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2011.12.018. Epub 2012 Jan 27.
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22285446
Author Address: International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, 59-61 North Wharf Road, London W2 1LA, UK. d.francis@imperial.ac.uk

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