Cardiology 2013 (Full reference info)

Reference Type: Journal Article
Record Number: 853Author: Berndt, N. C., Bolman, C., de Vries, H., Segaar, D., van Boven, I. and Lechner, L.
Year: 2013
Title: Smoking cessation treatment practices: recommendations for improved adoption on cardiology wards
Journal: J Cardiovasc Nurs
Volume: 28
Issue: 1
Pages: 35-47
Date: Jan-Feb
Short Title: Smoking cessation treatment practices: recommendations for improved adoption on cardiology wards
Alternate Journal: The Journal of cardiovascular nursing
ISSN: 1550-5049 (Electronic)
0889-4655 (Linking)
DOI: 10.1097/JCN.0b013e318231f424
Accession Number: 22048618
Keywords: Adult
Cardiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation/*methods
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Smoking cessation treatment practices described by the 5 A’s (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange) are not well applied at cardiology wards because of various reasons, such as a lack of time and appropriate skills of the nursing staff. Therefore, a simplified guideline proposing an ask-advise-refer (AAR) strategy was introduced in Dutch cardiac wards. This study aimed to identify factors that determine the intentions of cardiac ward heads in adopting the simplified AAR guideline, as ward heads are key decision makers in the adoption of new guidelines. Ward heads’ perceptions of current smoking cessation practices at the cardiac ward were also investigated. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey with written questionnaires was conducted among heads of cardiology wards throughout the Netherlands, of whom 117 (64%) responded. RESULTS: According to the heads of cardiac wards, smoking cessation practices by cardiologists and nurses were mostly limited to brief practices that are easy to conduct. Only a minority offered intensive counseling or arranged follow-up contact. Heads with strong intentions of adopting the AAR guideline differed significantly on motivational and organizational attributes and perceived more smoking cessation assistance by other health professionals than did heads with weak intentions of adopting. Positive attitudes, social support toward adoption, and perception of much assistance at the ward were significantly associated with increased intentions to adopt the AAR guideline. CONCLUSIONS: Brief smoking cessation practices are adequately performed at cardiac wards, but the most effective practices, offering assistance and arranging for follow-up, are less than optimal. The AAR guideline offers a more feasible approach for busy cardiology wards. To ensure successful adoption of this guideline, the heads of cardiac wards should be convinced of its advantages and be encouraged by a supportive work environment. Policies may also facilitate the adoption of the AAR guideline.
Notes: Berndt, Nadine C
Bolman, Catherine
de Vries, Hein
Segaar, Dewi
van Boven, Irene
Lechner, Lilian
eng
2011/11/04 06:00
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2013 Jan-Feb;28(1):35-47. doi: 10.1097/JCN.0b013e318231f424.
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22048618
Author Address: Department of Psychology, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, the Netherlands. nadine.berndt@ou.nl

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