Cardiology 2013 (Full reference info)

Reference Type: Journal Article
Record Number: 377Author: Frederick, M. A., Singh, T., Salami, S., Oetgen, W. J. and Rosman, H. S.
Year: 2013
Title: First steps: exploring use of a prospective, office-based registry as the foundation for quality improvement in cardiology training
Journal: J Grad Med Educ
Volume: 5
Issue: 4
Pages: 694-9
Date: Dec
Short Title: First steps: exploring use of a prospective, office-based registry as the foundation for quality improvement in cardiology training
Alternate Journal: Journal of graduate medical education
ISSN: 1949-8349 (Print)
1949-8357 (Linking)
DOI: 10.4300/JGME-D-13-00057.1
PMCID: 3886477
Accession Number: 24455027
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Teaching practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice are challenging. Cardiology fellows at St John Hospital & Medical Center participate in a national registry of outpatient cardiology care. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the use of the registry, hypothesizing that it could serve as an effective foundation for studying ambulatory care, identifying gaps in care, and planning interventions to advance competence in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice. METHODS: Starting in 2009, trainees prospectively entered data for ambulatory cardiac patients into the PINNACLE Registry database where compliance with 28 performance measures was calculated and reported quarterly. Fellows met with the program director individually and in groups to identify performance gaps and to develop and implement plans for quality improvement. Cardiology fellows were surveyed annually to assess this process. RESULTS: Through March 2012, the fellows had completed 2400 patient visits. Participation was feasible because it was cost neutral, with data form completion averaging 5 minutes. It was acceptable, with most fellows describing positive effects on practice-based learning and improvement without significant detriment to work flow. Performance achievement for drug therapies ranged from 69% (77 of 111) of the patients with atrial fibrillation receiving anticoagulation to 99% (486 of 489) of patients with coronary disease receiving lipid-lowering therapy. Gaps in system performance included low levels for diabetes screening (5%; 20 of 422) and lipid monitoring (10%; 58 of 573). Initial quality improvement projects addressed practice gaps with straightforward solutions. Improving system performance was more challenging. CONCLUSIONS: Using a registry in cardiology trainees’ outpatient practice is feasible, acceptable, and valuable. It allows for planning and studying the effects of quality improvement projects.
Notes: Frederick, Melissa A
Singh, Tejwant
Salami, Sule
Oetgen, William J
Rosman, Howard S
eng
2014/01/24 06:00
J Grad Med Educ. 2013 Dec;5(4):694-9. doi: 10.4300/JGME-D-13-00057.1.
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24455027

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