Cardiology 2013. Part II.

Notes: Ubeda, Carlos

Vano, Eliseo

Gonzalez, Luciano

Miranda, Patricia

eng

Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t

2012/08/18 06:00

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2013 Jul 1;82(1):51-7. doi: 10.1002/ccd.24602. Epub 2013 Feb 12.

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22899572

Author Address: Clinical Sciences Department and Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty, Tarapaca University, Arica, Chile. cubeda@uta.cl

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 1070Author: Uzark, K., King, E., Spicer, R., Beekman, R., Kimball, T. and Varni, J. W.

Year: 2013

Title: The clinical utility of health-related quality of life assessment in pediatric cardiology outpatient practice

Journal: Congenit Heart Dis

Volume: 8

Issue: 3

Pages: 211-8

Date: May-Jun

Short Title: The clinical utility of health-related quality of life assessment in pediatric cardiology outpatient practice

Alternate Journal: Congenital heart disease

ISSN: 1747-0803 (Electronic)

1747-079X (Linking)

DOI: 10.1111/chd.12002

Accession Number: 22967147

Keywords: Adolescent

Adolescent Behavior

*Ambulatory Care

*Cardiology

Child

Child Behavior

Cost of Illness

Emotions

Female

Health Services Research

Heart Defects, Congenital/diagnosis/physiopathology/*psychology/therapy

Humans

Male

*Pediatrics

Pilot Projects

Predictive Value of Tests

Quality Indicators, Health Care

*Quality of Life

*Questionnaires

Social Behavior

Treatment Outcome

Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Children with congenital heart disease may experience significant psychosocial morbidity related to impaired quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of health-related QOL assessment in a pediatric cardiology outpatient clinic. DESIGN: The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales were completed by a convenience sample of 176 patients, aged 8-18 years, being seen in a pediatric cardiology clinic. Three cardiologists enrolled in this study reviewed the completed PedsQL during the clinic visit and recorded their responses to items reported to be a problem “Often” or “Almost Always.” This utilization of the instrument was compared to standardized scoring and the practicality and perceived usefulness of the practice was evaluated by physician interview. RESULTS: PedsQL responses showed 38% of patients reporting significant (Often or Almost Always) problems on at least one domain (19% Physical Functioning, 18.2% Emotional Functioning, 11.4% Social Functioning, and 22.3% School Functioning problems). Using standardized scoring, the prevalence of scores below the cutoff score for clinically significant impaired QOL in each domain ranged from 10% to 20%, with agreement between scoring methods ranging from 89% to 93%, sensitivity 68% to 86%, and specificity 89% to 97%. Cardiologists reported interventions in 30.1% of patients. They found that the PedsQL was easy to use, did not interfere with clinic operations, required minimal time (1-5 minutes), and provided information that had an important impact on their practice in some patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the clinical utility of health-related QOL assessment using the PedsQL in a pediatric cardiology outpatient setting. Identification of significant impairments in QOL can impact clinical decision making and may change psychosocial outcomes in children with congenital heart disease.

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